Science Centre Singapore, KidsSTOP™ and Omni-Theatre are closed on 7, 14 Oct 2019.

Temporary Closure at KidsSTOP™ Tinkering Room and the Crank in Built Environment (Crane) exhibit due to repair works.

Dear Guests, please note that KidsSTOP™ is FULLY BOOKED for the Afternoon Session on 4 Oct 2019.

Powerful new computers, unbreakable encryption and sensors that can measure the tiniest shifts in time and gravity – these are among the outcomes expected from the global research in quantum technologies.

We are on the cusp of the quantum age. Quantum information technologies are
transforming how we live, work and play. New quantum technologies, like the quantum computer, quantum information security, quantum sensors, etc, are emerging from research labs around the world ... all with tremendous possibilities. Quantum information technology promises to truly transform our world.

Come see the quantum science and technology contributions by Singapore research institutions, alongside the exhibits originally curated by the Institute of Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Canada.

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CAT IN SUPERPOSITION

Classical physics says light is an electromagnetic wave that can oscillate in any direction. The direction in which the electric field oscillates is called polarization. Polarizers only let through light of a given polarization. View the projected images of the famous Schrödinger’s cat through a polarizer to reveal the cat in different states. What does seeing the 2 states of the same cat at the same time imply?

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WHAT TIME IS IT?

A*STAR’s National Metrology Centre contributes to defining the world’s standard time, by maintaining a bank of caesium atomic clocks that measure time according to the international definition of the second. The Centre also provides Singapore Standard Time to help synchronise the power grid, financial trades, internet traffic, and more.

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QUANTUM SATELLITES

This GOMX-2 nanosatellite carries a quantum light source built by the Centre for Quantum Technologies (CQT), NUS. During its 2014 launch, the rocket exploded just after take-off. But this GOMX-2 survived, remarkably, still fully functional. Since then, CQT has successfully launched 2 other instruments in 2016 and 2019.

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DEFECTS IN DIAMONDS MAKE WONDERFUL QUANTUM SENSORS

A diamond’s defect holds electrons that can absorb green light and emit red photons when near a very weak magnetic field. Scientists can potentially use this to sense the spin of the hydrogen nucleus – the proton. In this way, they can create very sensitive sensors that can make 3D images of small molecules; more importantly, images of complex biological molecules, like proteins.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

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